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Tung Ping Chau was once the home of a bustling island community, with a population of over 2000 in its heyday. In the 50`s,there were about 1500 people living in the ten villages on the island. Most of the Tung Ping Chau villages are originally from Mirs Bay. These settlers have made Ping Chau their home for many years. They have ven developed a local dialect´┐ŻFFFwPing Chau Wa.

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villagers here were either farmers or fishermen. Tung Ping Chau was famous for its rich marine and agricultural produce vlike abalone, sea urchin, seaweed, peanut, sweet potato and fish. the local catch boasted a wide variety of fish, such as Black Sea Bream, Red Pargo, Macau Sole, Green Wrasse, Brown Spotted Grouper, Scorpion Fish, Gizzard Shad, Mackerel Scad, Golded Sardine, Round Herring, Parrot Fish,cuttle fish, squids, shrimps and crabs. As for agricultural and farm produce, there were home bred pigs, poultry and cattle for domestic consumption, as well as peanuts, sweet potatoes, vegetables and fruits. Unlike villagers inthe New Territories, Tung Ping Chau has no rice fields because the local cistern facilities were not adequate.

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Tung Ping Chau has no potable water and electricity supply. To address this problem, villagers had dug wells avd cisterns, and even built a small reservoir at the back of its kind on the island, can hold 900 cubic metres of water.In addition, every village has its own large cistern, while most households have their own small water tanks. Despite all these water works, water supply has remained a problem through the years. Today,the islanders can just about manage with their free-standing rainwater storage tanks, as the demand for water is quite small. Next to water, energy is another concern. In the past, villagers used firewood and kerosene for cooking and lighting. Today, villagers, police and park staff station on the island rely on free-standing generators for their power supply.

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Life on the island was still trying. Tung Ping Chau has no fertile soil, hills or woodlands. There were serious water supply and communication problems. Seeking a better life, many villagers left Tung Ping Chau for urban Hong Kong. Some even emigrated to the UK and Holland. By the early 70`s,only a few old people remained on the island. These old folks enjoyed the slow pace of village life, making a living on sun dried cuttlefish and seaurchin cream.


 

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A good part of Tung Ping Chau is included in the Plover Cove Country Park.To serve the functional purposes of the country park, the Agriculture, Fisheries and Conservation Department has equipped Tung Ping Chau with basic facilities like a circular Country Trail and linking paths, picnic areas, camp sites, information boards waymarkers, shelters and washrooms. To create a more pleasant recreational environment, the Authority has planted a wide variety of trees that suited to the locatable terrain.

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lf you wish to stay overnight, you can either camp at designated camping sites or check into a ''grocery shop lodge''. The latter are six lodges which were formerly village houses with very basic fittings .Advance booking is required , and rates are usually quite competitive. The owners will prepare beds and simple meals for you.


A number of these grocery shop lodges have scuba diving and snorkeling equipment for hire. Visitors who wish to take a dive to see Tung Ping Chau 's famous coral formations may make inquiries when they book their accommodation.


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